A virtual museum done right

So there’s always been lots of talk (and perhaps somewhat less action :) ) about how virtual worlds are potentially great delivery vehicles for education, and schools, and museums, and all like that there.

There are a number of different ways to approach the idea, from wild “pretty much Not Possible In Real Life” things like that amazing and/or disturbing Virtual Schizophrenia build from the other year, to simple “upload my 2D art and put it on the walls of a virtual room” galleries, to novel interactive things that are about other things and that are yet to be built.

As an example of how to build a virtual museum about real-life artworks and artifacts, I can’t recommend highly enough the Peter Vos Museum in Second Life, as covered briefly in these two notes in NWN, and as covered most visually and memorably in this Yesikita Coppola machinima:

The machinima is very well done, and if for some reason you can’t get to the museum itself, by all means watch it.

But if you can get to the museum yourself, I’d suggest doing that first! Or at least second. :) I went the other day (and then got sick and almost forgot that I’d wanted to weblog about it), and am glad I did.

I knew nothing about Peter Vos before visiting the museum, and now I feel both fascinated and well-informed, as well as having come home with some nice souvenirs. The museum is a lovely build, perfectly fit to the purpose, and taking advantage of the SL environment in subtle but effective ways; the lighting is dark with focused lights, as a museum should be, the synchronized slide projectors are definitely synchronized slide projectors, making just the right soft sounds, the little peepholes that let you examine some of the smaller works close up are perfect little peepholes, that zoom your default camera position right in where it ought to be, while making your avatar bend in just the right “museum visitor peering into one of those little peepholes” pose.

About the art itself I won’t say much; it should be experienced. :) Nothing conventional, many many birds, and considerable surreality.

(The story behind the museum, the connections between the artist, the museum builder, and the machinimatographer, are quite a story in themselves, but I’ll let you discover that for yourself also!)

I would commend this both to anyone as a museum to be visited, and to anyone thinking of building a virtual museum (or gallery, or school, or…) as an example of one very effective way to do it. It’s just one point in the (big!) space of possible approaches, but it’s a very well done one, and definitely worth a visit.

A poem, and a painting, come alive

It’s been my pleasure and privilege to be part of another of Karima Hoisan’s amazing Kitely sims, based this time on one of her lovely poems.  (See previously The Hudson Line, based on the Hudson line, and In Your Head, based on your head (well…).)

The poem is here, and the artist’s own posting on the sim is here; I urge you to follow both those links, and then experience the Kitely sim for yourself, if you do the Kitely thing at all. (And if you don’t, maybe you should; it turns out you’re still allowed to use SL, too! /grin ).

And in the meantime, here are a couple (more) pictures, as further incentive:

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Doing the scripting for this sim was great fun, and I hope there is at least one thing that makes you scratch your head and think “How did they do that?”.  Most likely it is the result of Ms. Hoisan and I racking our brains for a few days trying to figure out how to get a particular effect, and then when it seemed impossible her saying “I don’t suppose we could…?” and me smacking my forehead.  :)

Follow Your Road…. All The Way To Success!!

I know I mostly reblog other people’s things these days :) but it’s because they are cool. This is another Karima and Nat machinima, this one with a great RL aspect to it. I was one of the actors again (in a bigger role even, he said modestly), but what those two, and the RL band, have done with our actors’ posing about is really amazing; watch and enjoy!

Digital Rabbit Hole

Costa Rica's Own..Home-Grown BandCosta Rica’s Own..Home-Grown Band

(Version en Español aquí)

  This isthe case of the hottest new Latin Musical group,” El Combo Style,” from my home country, Costa Rica. Really, just keep doing what you’re doing and share your talent with the world!
I love a good cause, and for me, people with artistic talent, dedication and humility are always a good cause.
The first time I heard this group, was in some studio recordings from the University of Costa Rica.
Even though the quality was not the best, I saw, felt and most importantly heard, the talent of this very tight and charismatic band.
David Mendez who plays trombone and maracas, (blind since early childhood) and David Jimenez (singer-guitarist) are part of the backbone of this band. D. Jimenez writes all the songs and lyrics and D. Mendez  along with Gerson Rodriguez on keyboard make all the musical arrangements…

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The New Gallery again

Wow, I haven’t posted here since April? At least it was April of this year. :)

So the other night a friend and I wandered downslope from the Rise into Mooter, where Gee Blackadder has some nice stuff, and in the nice stuff we discovered this piece of art for sale (“Afrodita”, by Kyra) that I thought I would buy a copy of and put up in the Gallery, so I did; here it is up in the New Gallery:

afrodita, by Kyra

I really ought to put a little TP to the gallery somewhere, or even list it in Art Galleries of Second Life or something, as it’s kind of as nice little place (I say modestly) with a slowly-evolving set of pieces by various people, mostly not me.

And then at the top you can sit on the viewing blocks and just bliss out staring into the ThingMaker (which is by me) and listening to the SomaFM music on the stream (assuming I haven’t changed it to something else).

Some random Thingmaker-as-art snapshots, with Shadows on, taken just at sunset. Or perhaps sunrise.

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Thingmaker in New Gallery 4

That LM again! :)

(Hm, I really ought to install some instructions in the little ball-controlling game that’s outside the gallery, if I’m going to tempt people to go there. Or maybe it’s sufficiently intuitive…)

My acting career continues! :)

Marvelous talented friends Karima and Nat have another movie out, Drink Me With Your Eyes; another rendering of one of Karima’s poems (a passionate piece in mixed English and Spanish), in amazing visuals of dancers and horses and eyes and… well, go see it. :)

rearing horse

I got a little bit part in the bar scenes (expertly sitting on a poseball!), and also in the horses-running-about scenes (as the Slightly Confused Horse), and got to contribute a little miscellaneous scripting also. But mostly just watched Karima and Nat and wondered to myself how they do it.

I will stick to scripting. :) Although I understand some people find that mysterious also!

“Festival of Love” Comes to LINC Island Friday Oct. 18th 1:30-2pmslt

This is just to reblog this post of the same name on Digital Rabbit Hole, ’cause this sounds awesome, and it’s tomorrow already, and I may or may not be trapped out in RL where my selfish atomic self is like changing employers or some silly RL diversion like that.

Extremely talented friends Karima an’ Nat will be hosting a half-hour segment of this German-based virtual-worlds Culture and Art event, and showing two (and possibly a teaser for a third) of their wonderful Machinimas (Machinimae?).

Oh, just go over there and read all about it! And attend! :)

Moving Trains

That title is a pun, since these particular trains that move scriptily down the track are in a video that is itself quite moving in the emotional sort of way.

As the official announcement from Karima Hoisan says, Karima and Natascha Randt’s “Window on a Train” is now up for general viewing an’ admiration.

Here it is on the “You Tube”:

and note that per Director Randt “Watching our film without being in full-screen and HD (720p) is Prohibited!” :)

I don’t want to say anything specific about the movie itself, because I think it has the most impact when viewed with the least preconceptions. Do prepare to be touched…

Machinima in general is so cool. I am not a visual person myself, so generally I can only sort of gawk (or make pictures with math), but I am pleased to say that in this case I was able to contribute, in the form of some scripts to provide smooth and mostly consistent motion in three objects (an engine and two cars) that were far too primmy to make physical, and also far too primmy to link together.

If I can gather up the energy and time :) I will post about it (the one-word giveaway is LLSetKeyframedMotion, which having been added to LSL later than 2007, is for me a Strange New Thing in the world, which proved Just Right for this particular use-case).

But anyway! Watch the movie! :) It is good!